6096 Reblog

1 day ago

calumsbaby:

i feel like calum isn’t really the type to give you his jacket instead he’ll tell you to put your arms inside his jacket so you can hold his waist and he’ll let you nuzzle your face in his chest while he rests his cheek on top of your head and then he takes his large hands around your waist and pulls you closer to him what am I DoING

(Source: 420calum, via masturbassist)

43770 Reblog

1 day ago

larrystylinsons:

rememben when liam zayn and louis did the thing 

(via onedirectioncutefacts)

33035 Reblog

1 day ago

malfoymannor:

epic songs to write to, a playlist for writers [listen here]

time, hans zimmer; misty mountains, howard shore; what are you going to do when you’re not saving the world?, hans zimmer; genius next door, regina spektor; hedwig’s theme, john williams; star trek’s main theme, michael giacchino; london calling, michael giacchino; mhysa, ramin djawadi; courtyard apocalypse, alexandre desplat; main title, ramin djawadi; cosmic love, florence + the machine; your ghost, greg laswell; one day more, les mis cast; veni, veni emmanuel, libera; oblivion, bastille;

(via leedshappened)

247228 Reblog

1 day ago

killerquean:

I Think I Am In Friend-Love With You” written by and illustrated by Yumi Sakugawa, published in Sadie Magazine, 2012.

(Source: durianseeds, via the-curiousone)

4291 Reblog

1 day ago

a-book-lover:

totallynohomohowelllester:

there are 67,203 words in The Fault In Our Stars,

313 pages,

9 major characters,

25 chapters,

And with only 8 of those words, 1 of those pages in the 21st chapter, John Green managed to bring that major character count down to 8, bringing almost every reader to tears upon reading the words “Augustus Waters died eight days after his prefuneral.”

how dare you

(Source: ughspooky, via youcansitbesidemeifyouwantto)

6538 Reblog

1 day ago

"I am angry that I starved my brain and that I sat shivering in my bed at night instead of dancing or reading poetry or eating ice cream or kissing a boy or maybe a girl with gentle lips and strong hands."
Laurie Halse Anderson (via leavemetonguetied)

(via welldressedmesses)

13086 Reblog

1 day ago

"I know exactly what I would do with immortality: I would read every book in the library."
Mark Jason Dominus (via bibliophilebunny)

(via zweiundzwanzig)

581 Reblog

1 day ago

"A good book is an event in my life."
Stendhal, The Red and the Black (via observando)

(via shvtd0wn)

203429 Reblog

1 day ago

"I’m pretty tired of adults telling me how stupid teens are."
John Green, on whether or not his characters are ‘too intelligent’ (via asschester)

(Source: arollercoasterthatonlygoesup, via iwalkamoungthestars)

230563 Reblog

1 day ago

Rare Words

rosettes:

acosmist - One who believes that nothing exists
paralian - A person who lives near the sea
aureate - Pertaining to the fancy or flowery words used by poets 
dwale - To wander about deliriously
sabaism - The worship of stars
dysphoria - An unwell feeling
aubade - A love song which is sung at dawn
eumoirous - Happiness due to being honest and wholesome
mimp - To speak in a prissy manner, usually with pursed lips

(Source: milkthistles, via imperfectionlieshere)

130840 Reblog

1 day ago

"Writing Advice: by Chuck Palahniuk

In six seconds, you’ll hate me.
But in six months, you’ll be a better writer.

From this point forward—at least for the next half year—you may not use “thought” verbs. These include: Thinks, Knows, Understands, Realizes, Believes, Wants, Remembers, Imagines, Desires, and a hundred others you love to use.

The list should also include: Loves and Hates.
And it should include: Is and Has, but we’ll get to those later.

Until some time around Christmas, you can’t write: Kenny wondered if Monica didn’t like him going out at night…”

Instead, you’ll have to Un-pack that to something like: “The
mornings after Kenny had stayed out, beyond the last bus, until he’d had to bum a ride or pay for a cab and got home to find Monica faking sleep, faking because she never slept that quiet, those mornings, she’d only put her own cup of coffee in the microwave. Never his.”

Instead of characters knowing anything, you must now present the details that allow the reader to know them. Instead of a character wanting something, you must now describe the thing so that the reader wants it.

Instead of saying: “Adam knew Gwen liked him.” You’ll have to say: “Between classes, Gwen had always leaned on his locker when he’d go to open it. She’s roll her eyes and shove off with one foot, leaving a black-heel mark on the painted metal, but she also left the smell of her perfume. The combination lock would still be warm from her butt. And the next break, Gwen would be leaned there, again.”

In short, no more short-cuts. Only specific sensory detail: action, smell, taste, sound, and feeling.

Typically, writers use these “thought” verbs at the beginning of a paragraph (In this form, you can call them “Thesis Statements” and I’ll rail against those, later). In a way, they state the intention of the paragraph. And what follows, illustrates them.

For example:
“Brenda knew she’d never make the deadline. was backed up from the bridge, past the first eight or nine exits. Her cell phone battery was dead. At home, the dogs would need to go out, or there would be a mess to clean up. Plus, she’d promised to water the plants for her neighbor…”

Do you see how the opening “thesis statement” steals the thunder of what follows? Don’t do it.

If nothing else, cut the opening sentence and place it after all the others. Better yet, transplant it and change it to: Brenda would never make the deadline.

Thinking is abstract. Knowing and believing are intangible. Your story will always be stronger if you just show the physical actions and details of your characters and allow your reader to do the thinking and knowing. And loving and hating.

Don’t tell your reader: “Lisa hated Tom.”

Instead, make your case like a lawyer in court, detail by detail.

Present each piece of evidence. For example: “During roll call, in the breath after the teacher said Tom’s name, in that moment before he could answer, right then, Lisa would whisper-shout ‘Butt Wipe,’ just as Tom was saying, ‘Here’.”

One of the most-common mistakes that beginning writers make is leaving their characters alone. Writing, you may be alone. Reading, your audience may be alone. But your character should spend very, very little time alone. Because a solitary character starts thinking or worrying or wondering.

For example: Waiting for the bus, Mark started to worry about how long the trip would take…”

A better break-down might be: “The schedule said the bus would come by at noon, but Mark’s watch said it was already 11:57. You could see all the way down the road, as far as the Mall, and not see a bus. No doubt, the driver was parked at the turn-around, the far end of the line, taking a nap. The driver was kicked back, asleep, and Mark was going to be late. Or worse, the driver was drinking, and he’d pull up drunk and charge Mark seventy-five cents for death in a fiery traffic accident…”

A character alone must lapse into fantasy or memory, but even then you can’t use “thought” verbs or any of their abstract relatives.

Oh, and you can just forget about using the verbs forget and remember.

No more transitions such as: “Wanda remembered how Nelson used to brush her hair.”

Instead: “Back in their sophomore year, Nelson used to brush her hair with smooth, long strokes of his hand.”

Again, Un-pack. Don’t take short-cuts.

Better yet, get your character with another character, fast.
Get them together and get the action started. Let their actions and words show their thoughts. You—stay out of their heads.

And while you’re avoiding “thought” verbs, be very wary about using the bland verbs “is” and “have.”

For example:
“Ann’s eyes are blue.”

“Ann has blue eyes.”

Versus:

“Ann coughed and waved one hand past her face, clearing the cigarette smoke from her eyes, blue eyes, before she smiled…”

Instead of bland “is” and “has” statements, try burying your details of what a character has or is, in actions or gestures. At its most basic, this is showing your story instead of telling it.

And forever after, once you’ve learned to Un-pack your characters, you’ll hate the lazy writer who settles for: “Jim sat beside the telephone, wondering why Amanda didn’t call.”

Please. For now, hate me all you want, but don’t use thought verbs. After Christmas, go crazy, but I’d bet money you won’t.

(…)

For this month’s homework, pick through your writing and circle every “thought” verb. Then, find some way to eliminate it. Kill it by Un-packing it.

Then, pick through some published fiction and do the same thing. Be ruthless.

“Marty imagined fish, jumping in the moonlight…”

“Nancy recalled the way the wine tasted…”

“Larry knew he was a dead man…”

Find them. After that, find a way to re-write them. Make them stronger.

"

(via 1000wordseveryday)

I need to go back to school.

(via cordeliagablewrites)inspiration

(via thescienceofobsession)

My learning is ofwficially insignificant. My writing minor and all those classes do not make me as qualified as reading this has.

(via kikukachan)

(Source: redactedbeastie, via kyu-un)

173627 Reblog

1 day ago

equalpartsscienceandwonder:

yonceyall:

all of these are very important

YES I AM ALL ABOUT THIS

(Source: etoilesdelanuit, via bandscth)

774345 Reblog

1 day ago

laterovaries:

royal-meenah-peixes:

glitterbites:

Collecting these because no one understands their genius. They make me want to go to school. Ps please don’t change the source!

But can we talk about the kilometer one and how the kid got in trouble because he was right?

I hope these kids all got a high fives from their parents…

(via alltimelowlukehemmings)

4869 Reblog

1 day ago

lucas-is-my-prince:

BAND MEMBER OR A PUNK-ROCK BALLERINA ?

99% OF PEOPLE WILL GET THIS WRONG.

(via lucas-is-my-prince)

664944 Reblog

1 day ago

jewishsanta:

when books make you cry like fuck you book you’re a stack of paper

(via notchanging)

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